identity crisis: cookie or not?

22 Mar

Currently, school is KILLING me. Just today, I spent the majority of 6 hours trying to procrastinate writing the English essay that’s due this week. Why am I so on top of the ball, you ask? I’m not. It’s due Thursday, but between all the editing, Satrbucks work and classes I have to do, I knew I didn’t have time. So I sat my ass down today to write my essay – and ended up baking identity crisis-ridden cookie/cakes for Tasha. I made these toffee oatmeal cookie bars a while back and Opie & her boy, Tasha and their dad really liked them. Tasha’s birthday is this week, and since I won’t have time during the week, I decided to bake them today, and get them to her asap. However, since it’s going to be a present, I didn’t want to simply make these bars, I wanted them to look prettier. Therefore, I decided to go ahead and make them as I usually do, but roll them into balls and bake them in muffin tins! And then, create a little crater filled with toffee goodness! tada! identity crisis oatmeal toffee cookie/cakes! They are waaay bigger than cookies but waay chewier than (cup)cakes!

yum yum in my tum tum! I think I was “writing my essay” and eating these at the same time. It didn’t make the writing come any faster, but it sure eased the pain.

You can probably use your favourite oatmeal cookie recipe in here. I couldn’t find buttermilk in any of my grocery stores, so I couldn’t use my favourite/standard oatmeal recipe today. Instead, I’ve tried out a new one.  Feel free to add raising and/or chocolate chips, but I decided to add some cinnamon and keep it simple. I find the toffee is plenty sweet enough as it is. If you like the bars, then just squish the mix into a pan. The key is to bake it pretty much through before sprinkling the toffee on top, or else it’ll become too bubbly!

Did you know that oatmeal cookies trace their ancestry to the oatcakes, or bannocks, made by the Scots and the British?  The popularization of the modern oatmeal cookie can be attributed to Quaker Oats, which published a recipe for these yummy cookies on all their oats containers in the early 1900s, and have enjoyed a connection with these cookies ever since! Ha, this is what I researched instead of researching Socrates! Who says that baking isn’t educational?

Enjoy the sugar attack!

the not-so-secret ingredient: Skor toffee pieces!

the not-so-secret ingredient: Skor toffee pieces!

what are they! cookies? cupcakes? cakes?

what are they! cookies? cupcakes? cakes?

whatever they are, they are soo addicting!

whatever they are, they are soo addicting!

can you see the nice layer of melted, crunchy toffee?

can you see the nice layer of melted, crunchy toffee?

...and this is what happens when I go to answer the phone!

...and this is what happens when I go to answer the phone!

sealed in for freshness & just waiting for a pretty box, tissue paper and a bow

sealed in for freshness & just waiting for a pretty box, tissue paper and a bow

Recipe

Makes about 4 dozen regular cookies, 16 identity crisis cookies or enough for 1 baking pan

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 cup softened butter
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 3 cups old-fashioned/quick oats (but NOT instant oats!)
  • 1/2 Skor toffee pieces

How-to:

  1. Preheat oven to 350F. Line baking pan or muffin tins with parchment paper/cupcake liners.
  2. Sift together flour, baking soda, salt, nutmeg and cinnamon into a medium bowl and set aside.
  3. In another bowl, cream together butter and sugars on medium speed for several minutes until light and fluffy.
  4. Add eggs and vanilla. Mix until combined.
  5. Add flour mixture and mix on low until just combined. With a spatula or a big spoon, stir in oats (and raisins and/or chocolate chips).
  6. Depending on how you’re baking them, scoop out table-spoon sized balls of dough and drop into prepared muffin tins OR dump the mix into your baking pan and evenly spread it out with your hands.
  7. For muffin tin, bake for 15 minutes. Take the pan out of the oven, press down the middle a bit to create a crater/indent and spoon in the toffee on top. Return to oven for another 3 minutes. Take the pan out and let cool.
  8. For baking pan, bake for 20 minutes, testing for firmness. Sprinkle liberally with toffee and return to oven for another 3 minutes. Remove and let cool for 5 minutes. You want to start cutting the bars before it cools completely because the toffee makes your job very hard otherwise.
  9. Enjoy warmed up or cool, with a nice glass of cold milk!

xo dessertchick

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